Reflecting on Resilience as I Recover & Strategies to Build Your Bounce Series Kickoff

Reflecting on Resilience as I Recover & Strategies to Build Your Bounce Series Kickoff

It’s Day 164 of the Pink Collar Savvy & Chic on Purpose Project, and since I was down another day with my recent diverticulitis diagnosis, I spent part of it reflecting on resilience as I recover. Yesterday, Day 163, I was too sick to post, and though I’m not much better today, I’m determined to bounce back and write. Blogging daily has been a gift and now comprises a part of my Savvy & Chic Resiliency Strategy.

I first learned about resiliency when I worked in the early childhood field. Though the focus was building resilience in children, it stood to reason that parents and adults must be resilient to support the children in their lives. Then, a mentor turned friend, Christina Kelley, presented on “Building Your Bounce” at the last conference I attended as an early childhood professional. Though that was three years ago, I’ve applied the knowledge and tools ever since.

Now I coach women in the workplace who are facing personal barriers to minimize those in order to maximize their beauty and best professional lives. And after four days of dealing with diverticulitis, I’m painfully aware (pun intended) that I need to take a dose of my own coaching medicine! Based on the Devereux Adult Resiliency Survey (DARS) there are four protective factors related to thoughts and behaviors that support adult resiliency. Below I’ve shared these factors, their definitions, and listed items you may identify as either strengths or areas of opportunity. I hope you’ll reflect on the latter and then read tomorrow’s post for some strategies on how to build your bounce in those areas.

Adult Resiliency Protective Factors

Relationships – The mutual, long-lasting, reciprocal bonds we share with others in our lives.

  • Good friends who provide you with support.
  • A mentor or someone who shows you the way.
  • You provide support to others.
  • You are empathetic to others.
  • You trust your close friends.

Internal Beliefs – The thoughts and feelings we have about ourselves, our lives and how we feel about our effectiveness to take action in life.

  • Your role as a caregiver is important.
  • You have personal strengths.
  • You are creative.
  • You have strong beliefs.
  • You are hopeful about the future.
  • You are lovable.

Initiative – The ability to make decisions and positive choices and to follow through with them.

  • You communicate effectively with those around you.
  • You try many different ways to solve a problem.
  • You have a hobby that you engage in.
  • You seek out new knowledge.
  • You are open to new ideas.
  • You laugh often.
  • You are able to say no.
  • You can ask for help.

Self-Control – The ability to experience and express a range of feelings using socially appropriate words and actions.

  • You can express your emotions.
  • You set limits for yourself.
  • You are flexible.
  • You can calm yourself down.

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As a Pink Collar Savvy & Chic on Purpose Chick who is dealing with another D (barrier), I understand from experience how critical it is to make sure our adult resiliency protective factors are in place as we navigate the ups and downs of life. I’m looking forward to diving deeper especially since I probably won’t be out and about for a few more days! Besides, reflecting on resilience as I recover and supporting you with strategies to build your bounce is a way to minimize my barrier and maximize my purpose while I’m down with diverticulitis!

Which of the above are strengths for you? Which are areas of opportunity? I hope you’ll visit tomorrow to learn how you can build your own Savvy & Chic Resilience Strategy!

Be savvy & chic,

~Pink Collar Coach

All of the information is from the book cover featured here. You can also go to http://www.devereuxearlychildhood.org for more information.

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